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If you have any of these symptoms, you may have dry eyes:

bulletDry sensation
bulletTired Eyes
bulletScratchy, gritty feeling
bulletLight sensitivity
bulletBurning
bulletContact lens discomfort
bulletStinging
bulletContact lens solution sensitivity
bulletItching
bulletSoreness
bulletExcess tearing (watery eyes)
bulletLid infections, styes
bulletMucous discharge
bulletSensitivity to artificial tears
bulletIrritation from wind or smoke
bulletAllergies
bulletRedness
bulletEyelids stuck upon awakening

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TWO TYPES OF TEARS 

Your eyes are lubricated by two different types of tears produced by the tear glands in your upper and lower eyelids.  Constant tears are continuously produced to lubricate the eye at all times and contain natural antibiotics to fight infections.  Reflex tears are only produced in response to irritation, injury or emotion to help rinse the surface of the eye.  If the constant tears are inadequate, the eye becomes irritated.   Then the reflex tears take over which is why one can have watery, teary eyes as a result of dry eyes.

A DELICATE BALANCE IS NEEDED

A delicate balance is needed between constant and reflex tears, in addition to a satisfactory blink reflex, to help ensure that your eyes will be comfortable, well-lubricated and well-protected.  If the tear drainage ducts are too large, the constant tear supply is drained away quickly especially if the tear supply is already reduced for various reasons.

FIVE COMMON CAUSES OF DRY EYE SYNDROME

bulletBlinking.  If the tear drainage system is overactive, dry eye symptoms may occur.
bulletAging.  Tear production can decrease by as much as 60% at age 65 than at age 18.
bulletEnvironment.  High altitudes; sunny, dry windy conditions; and the use of heaters, blowers, hair dryers and air conditioners increase tear evaporation and reduce eye lubrication.
bulletContact Lenses.  Contacts can dramatically increase tear evaporation causing irritation, infection, protein deposits and pain.
bulletMedications.  Decongestants, antihistamines, diuretics, medication for heart disease, arthritis and ulcers all decrease lubricating tears causing dry eye syndrome.

LONG TERM SOLUTION

Through canalicular occlusion (the medical term that describes the closure of your tear drainage ducts), there is a simple non-surgical procedure to provide long-term relief of Dry Eye Syndrome and congestion of the nose, throat and sinuses which accompanies it.

More than half a million dry eye suffers have been successfully treated, through canalicular occlusion, with Herrick Lacrimal Plus™ and other plugs. 

Here's how they work:

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Small, non-dissolvable plugs are inserted in the tear drainage ducts.  By blocking the tear drains, more natural infection-fighting tears bathe and soothe the eye, which may eliminate the need for eye drops altogether.  Lacrimal plugs can also reduce or eliminate the major cause of contact lens discomfort.

This type of plug is more easily removable because they seat at the duct opening:

            

                   Parasol® Plus              Ophthalmics FCI

CAN CANALICULAR OCCLUSION HELP YOU?

The Lacrimal Efficiency Test™ can help Dr. Espinosa and his staff recommend canalicular occlusion with confidence.  Small dissolvable plugs are inserted in the tear drainage ducts which dissolve within 4 to 7 days.  If you experience symptomatic relief during this test period, we may determine that you can benefit from the long-term closure of your tear drainage ducts.

Many of our patients who have suffered for years from long-term Dry Eye Syndrome report tremendous relief with this procedure.  Maybe it's the answer to some of your problems too!

ANOTHER POSSIBLE SOLUTION

There are now eye drops, Restasis™, that stimulate the production of our own natural tears.  Many of our patients have found relief for dry eyes by using these special eye drops on a twice a day basis.

 

To make an appointment ...

If you have any specific questions you'd like to ask of Dr. Espinosa, please email him:

Aniemail.gif (7085 bytes) drespinosa@earthlink.net

(800) 914-2020

(323) 261-3098

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